Pictures from space! Our image of the day

Space can be a wondrous place, and we’ve got the pictures to prove it! Take a look at our favorite pictures from space here, and if you’re wondering what happened today in space history don’t miss our On This Day in Space video show here!
 

Jupiter’s striking storms

(Image credit: NASA, ESA, STScI, A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center), M.H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley), and the OPAL team)

Sept. 18, 2020: This new, stunning image of Jupiter, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, was captured on Aug. 25, 2020 and shows the planet’s turbulent, swirling storms. In the photo, you can see the ripples in the planet’s atmosphere, Jupiter’s famous Great Red Spot and the planet’s striking colors. 

Reflecting radio beams

(Image credit: Leri Datashvili/Large Space Structures GmbH)

Sept. 17, 2020: This metal-mesh antenna reflector was created as part of the European Space Agency’s AMPER (Advanced techniques for mesh reflector with improved radiation pattern performance) project. Researchers are developing this mesh reflector technology to advance the performance and capabilities of large antennas. 

The Amazon river from space

(Image credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2019), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO)

Sept. 16, 2020: The Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellite captured this image of the Amazon River snaking its way through the Amazon rainforest in South America from space. The colors in this image come from two polarizations from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 radar mission which have been merged into one image.

West coast wildfires

(Image credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2020), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO)

Sept. 15, 2020: The massive amount of smoke billowing out from California in the U.S. can be seen from space, as you can see in this image taken Sept. 10 by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 satellite. There are as many as 100 wildfires currently raging in California and they have additionally spread into Washington and Oregon.

A serpent’s eye

(Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, J. Lee, and the PHANGS-HST Team Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt (Geckzilla))

Sept. 14, 2020: The spiral galaxy NGC 2835 sparkles out in the head of the constellation Hydra, as seen in this photo taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy is is about half as wide as the Milky Way and has a supermassive black hole millions of times more massive than our sun at its center. 

Galactic fireworks

These "galactic fireworks" are the colorful stars which make up the globular cluster NGC 1805, as seen in this photo taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. This cluster of thousands of stars is located out at the edge of the large Magellanic Cloud.

(Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, J. Kalirai; CC BY 4.0)

Sept. 11, 2020: These “galactic fireworks” are the colorful stars which make up the globular cluster NGC 1805, as seen in this photo taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. This cluster of thousands of stars is located out at the edge of the large Magellanic Cloud. 

A spacecraft’s backbone

(Image credit: Thales Alenia Space)

Sept. 10, 2020: This structure is the skeleton, or the frame and base, for the European Service Module that will be part of NASA’s Orion spacecraft, which, as part of the agency’s Artemis program, will return humans to the moon. This “backbone” for the Orion spacecraft was built in Turin, Italy at Thales Alenia Space. 

Typhoon Haishen

(Image credit: Chris Cassidy/Twitter)

Sept. 9, 2020: NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy took this photograph of Typhoon Haishen from aboard the International Space Station. The typhoon has led to seven million people being ordered to evacuate and, after hitting Japan it reached the Korean peninsula. 

A tilted galaxy

(Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, R. Tully)

Sept. 8, 2020: The Hubble Space Telescope spied the blue and orange stars of the faint, tilted galaxy NGC 2188, which is estimated to stretch about 50,000 light-years across. The galaxy, thought to be about half the size of the Milky Way, sits in the constellation Columba (the Dove). 

Earth from space

(Image credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2020), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO)

Sept. 4, 2020: This image shows the Gulf of Kutch, also known as the Gulf of Kachchh, an inlet of the Arabian Sea along India’s west coast. The photo was snapped by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, which is made up of two satellites. Each satellite of the mission has a high-resolution camera on board to allow the satellites to track changes in bodies of water on Earth. 

The Nereidum Mountain Range

(Image credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO)

Sept. 3, 2020: This color-coded topographic view shows the Nereidum Mountain range, which lies on the surface of Mars in the planet’s southern hemisphere. The image shows a region within the mountain range which is a part of the large Argyre impact basin, one of the biggest impact structures on the entire Red Planet. 

Plasma propulsion

(Image credit: SENER)

Sept. 2, 2020: The Helicon Plasma Thruster, developed by the European Space Agency by SENER in Spain, completes a test firing in this image. The thruster, which uses high power radio frequency waves to turn propellant into a plasma, is designed to propel small satellites and maintain large megaconstellations of satellites. 

Riding a blast wave

(Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, W. Blair; CC BY 4.0; Acknowledgement: Leo Shatz)

Sept. 1, 2020: This brilliant streak of light is a small section of the Cygnus supernova blast wave, as spotted by the Hubble Space Telescope. The blast, which is about 2,400 light-years away, was from a supernova explosion that tore apart a dying star 20 times more massive than our sun between 10,000 and 20,000 years ago. 

SpaceX nails another launch and landing

(Image credit: SpaceX)

Aug. 31, 2020: Saturday (Aug. 30, 2020), SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, carrying the SAOCOM 1B Earth-observation radar satellite for Argentina and two small rideshare payloads. This was SpaceX’s 15th launch of the year, successfully lifting off at 7:18 p.m. EDT (2318 GMT). Soon after launch, the booster’s first stage landed perfectly back on Earth. 

Galactic tails

(Image credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Cramer et al.; CC BY 4.0)

Aug. 28, 2020: In this image, which combines data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (which is installed on the Hubble Space Telescope) and the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii, you can see a cosmic tail emerging from the spiral galaxy D100. 

A spectacular, diffuse nebula

(Image credit: NASA, ESA, and M. Durbin, J. Dalcanton, and B. F. Williams (University of Washington))

Aug. 27, 2020: This image, snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope, shows the enormous, fluffy-looking nebula NGC 595. The nebula, located about three million light-years away from Earth in the Triangulum Galaxy, is made up of ionised hydrogen.  

Hurricane Laura from space

(Image credit: Chris Cassidy/NASA via Twitter)

Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2020:  Hurricane Laura looks fearsome in the Gulf of Mexico from orbit in this view from the International Space Station by NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy. 

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